header_image
Access to Markets
Notepad

Pitt River Bridge

The  Pitt River Bridge opened in fall 2009 and significantly opened up east-west transportation movements between the Tri-Cities (Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam and Port Moody) and Metro Vancouver, as well as air and port transportation.

The Pitt River Bridge:

  • Has three lanes of westbound traffic and four lanes of eastbound traffic that spans the Pitt River, connecting Pitt Meadows to the Tri-Cities and Metro Vancouver
  • There is up to 16 metres of vertical marine clearance, as well as facilities for cyclists and pedestrians
  • The new bridge has been designed to accommodate a future eighth lane that can be allocated for HOV or future rapid transit.

Source: Gateway Project

Golden Ears Bridge

The Golden Ears Bridge brings Pitt Meadows to the geographic and demographic centre of the Lower Mainland, with over 85 percent of the population located within 27 kilometres by major thoroughfares.

Completed in the summer of 2009, the Golden Ears Bridge created convenient north–south transportation movements across the Fraser River and opened up trade markets and reduced travel times to three US border crossings.

The Golden Ears Bridge:

  • Is a one kilometre long six-lane bridge that spans the Fraser River connecting Pitt Meadows to Langley and Surrey
  • It includes two-metre-wide cycling and pedestrian pathways on each side of vehicle traffic, protected by a concrete barrier
  • Features an electronic tolling system that allows drivers to cross the bridge and pay the toll without stopping.

Source: TransLink

Transportation

Highway 1 (Trans Canada Highway)

The Trans Canada Highway (Highway 1) runs east-west through most of Metro Vancouver including the communities of Langley, Surrey, Coquitlam, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver and Vancouver. Highway 1 and 1A are owned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and maintained by Mainroad Contracting Limited.

Approximately five minutes drive-time from Pitt Meadows via the Golden Ears Bridge, the Trans Canada Highway is the primary east-west numbered route through BC. It provides linkages and junctions with all major north-south routes providing connectivity across the province.

For information on Highway 1 – Trans Canada Highway and to check for highway traffic on the traffic cameras please go to the website.

Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway)

Highway 7, also known as the Lougheed Highway, travels east-west from the Vancouver/Burnaby border, connecting Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge. Highway 7 is owned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and maintained by Mainroad Contracting Limited.

Highway 7, known for most of its length as the Lougheed Highway, is an alternative route to Highway 1 through the Lower Mainland of BC. Whereas the controlled access Highway 1 follows the southern bank of the Fraser River, Highway 7 follows the northern bank.

For information on Highway 7 – Lougheed Highway please go to the website.

Highway 7B (Mary Hill Bypass)

Highway 7B, also known as the Mary Hill Bypass, runs for nine kilometres east-west through Port Coquitlam, connecting Pitt Meadows and the Lougheed Highway to Highway 1 (Trans Canada Highway).

It is owned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and maintained by Mainroad Contracting Limited.

For information on Highway 7B – Mary Hill Bypass please go to the website.

Highway 15

Highway 15 runs north-south for 20 kilometres through Surrey, connecting the Canada-US border to the Trans Canada Highway. It is also known as 176 Street and the Pacific Highway. It is owned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and maintained by Mainroad Contracting Limited.

This highway is one of the three routes from Pitt Meadows to the US border. Travel to the Pacific Highway border crossing takes less than 30 minutes.

For information on Highway 15 – Pacific Highway and to check for highway traffic on the traffic cameras please go to the website.

Source: TransLink

Ports

Deltaport

TSI Terminal Systems operates Deltaport under a long-term lease agreement with the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. The terminal is designed to handle the largest container ships afloat and features dual-hoist gantry cranes, along with super post-panamax cranes, three berths and advanced computer systems. Deltaport is ISPS compliant.

Source: TSI Deltaport

Port Metro Vancouver

Port Metro Vancouver is Canada’s largest and busiest port, a dynamic gateway for domestic and international trade and tourism and a major economic force that strengthens the Canadian economy.

As the fourth largest tonnage port in North America, Port Metro Vancouver offers 28 major marine cargo terminals and three Class 1 railroads, providing a full range of facilities and services to the international shipping community.

Port Metro Vancouver's deep-sea terminals offer virtually no draft restrictions, super post-panamax capacity and extensive on-dock rail facilities. The Port's freshwater facilities offer integrated services for the automobile and coastal forest industries, and for short-sea shipping. Port Metro Vancouver serves as homeport for the Vancouver-Alaska cruise industry.

Source: Port Metro Vancouver

Port of Prince Rupert

The Port of Prince Rupert is the deepest natural, year-round, ice-free harbour in North America. The entrance into the inner harbour ranges in depth between 34-44 metres. Depths at existing berths range between five and 20 meters. The new container terminal's berth depth will extend to 16 meters, more than sufficient to handle ships of 8,000 TEU.

One of the largest transcontinental railways and a major transcontinental highway connect the Port of Prince Rupert to the rest of North America. Prince Rupert is Canadian National (CN) railway's uncongested link into the North American continent. CN fits the definition of US Class 1 Railway and is the only transcontinental railway in North America. CN has wide-ranging links into the US mid-west and its reach extends into Mexico. The Trans Canada Highway links Prince Rupert to the rest of North America and the Alaska Highway links it northward.

Source: Port of Prince Rupert Authority

US Border Crossings

There are four US border crossings close to Pitt Meadows - three are within a 30 minute drive. The main car crossing is the Peace Arch crossing and it is open 24 hours a day. The main commercial vehicle crossing is the Pacific Crossing and it is open to commercial traffic 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Pacific Crossing

  • Location: 176th Street (Highway 15)
  • Commercial Truck Crossing: Yes (24/7)
  • Duty Free: Yes
  • Web cam

Aldergrove Crossing

  • Location: via 264th Street (off Highway 1)
  • Commercial Truck Crossing: Yes (8am-5pm Mon-Fri)
  • Duty Free: Yes
  • Web cam

Sumas Crossing (via Abbotsford)

  • Location: 3 km off Highway 1
  • Commercial Truck Crossing: Yes (8am-5pm Mon-Fri)
  • Duty Free: Yes
  • Web cam

Peace Arch

  • Location: 3 km off Highway 1
  • Commercial Truck Crossing: No
  • Duty Free: Yes
  • Web cam